Tokyo and Korea
Berkeley Summer Abroad

Tokyo and Seoul, Japan and South Korea

  • Summary

    Explore both Tokyo, Japan and Seoul, South Korea while learning about the histories of the Japan-Korea relations during and after the imperial occupation. Students will have the opportunity to meet with relevant lawmakers, diplomats, scholars, lawyers, journalists, civil society representatives, and in the case of Korea- survivors, who exhibit various and unique opinion and views on the "comfort women issues."

    Engage with both of the host country's students around course related material throughout the program
    Learn about different human rights organizations and their perspectives regarding Japan-Korea relations
    Participate in excursions to embassies, museums, and monuments

    On this program, you will have the opportunity to engage in issues of reparations, legal accountability, historical memories, truth and justice, apology and forgiveness, and reconciliation both at the personal and structural levels, via interacting directly with parties in conflict who represent such diverse positions.


    Dates: May 28 – July 5, 2017
    All dates are subject to change.

    Units: 6 units

    Language of Instruction: English

    Courses:
    • Global 143Q: Contentious History and Memory: "Comfort Women" Issues in Japan and Korea (6 units)

     

    Eligibility:

    • At least one year of college coursework completed by the start of the program
    • 2.0 GPA or higher

     

    Application:

    • Application opens February 1, 2017
    • Space is limited and applications are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis
    • Deadline to apply is March 10, 2017
  • Courses

    During the program, you will take one course for a total of 6 Berkeley units.

    Course: Global Studies 143Q
    Title: Contentious History and Memory: "Comfort Women" Issues in Japan and Korea
    Dates: May 28 – July 5, 2017
    Instructor: Tetsushi Ogata, Ph.D.
    Units: 6 units
    Prerequisites: None
    In this new study abroad course in Peace and Conflict Studies, students will travel to both Tokyo and Seoul in Summer 2017 and meet with relevant lawmakers, diplomats, scholars, lawyers, journalists, civil society representatives, and – in the case of Korea – survivors, who reflect a wide spectrum of opinions and views on the "comfort women issues." To move away from a simplified and dichotomous "perpetrator-victim" perspective, students will approach this topic in the context of wartime sexual and gender-based violence at a time when an imperial order was the norm. Students will also probe shifting narratives of wartime responsibilities in the post-war Japanese and Korean societies. In so doing, students will be invited to reflect upon "multiple perpetrators" and "multiple victims" across Japan and Korea, not only during the war, but also in the post-war era. Students will engage in issues of reparations, legal accountability, historical memories, truth and justice, apology and forgiveness, and reconciliation both at the personal and structural levels, by directly interacting with the conflict parties who represent such diverse positions. The course aims to provide students with the challenges and opportunities to explore viable options for the future of peaceful Japan-Korea relations.

    This course satisfies the L&S International Studies breadth requirement. Please note that academic requirements may change. Consult with your college/major advisor to see which degree requirements this course may fulfill.
  • Costs

    Tuition and Program Fee

    The fees to participate in this program are broken down into 1) tuition and 2) program fees, which are applied to your student billing account as follows:

    2017 Fees UC Students Visiting Students
    Tuition (6 units) $2,460 $3,120
    Program Fee $2,732 $2,732
    Total Cost $5,192 $5,852
    Fees are subject to change. All non-Berkeley students must pay an additional Document Management Fee of $55.

    Estimated Out-of-Pocket Expenses

    In addition to the fees outlined above, Berkeley Study Abroad has estimated costs for out-of-pocket expenses. These amounts are used to calculate financial aid packages for eligible students. Actual expenses will vary depending on your lifestyle and spending habits.

    Estimated Expenses Amount
    International Airfare and Transportation $1,800
    Additional Meals $1,444
    Books $312
    Personal Expenses (i.e., phone, passport, visas, etc.) $811
    Total Estimated Out-of-Pocket Expenses $4,367

    Financial Aid

    Financial aid is available for Berkeley students who are enrolled in at least 6 units during the summer. All other students should contact the financial aid office at their home institution for more information.

    Explanation of Fees

    Tuition is based on a per-unit cost: 

    • The UC undergraduate student rate is $410 per unit
    • The visiting student rate for all non-UC participants is $520 per unit

    The program fee includes the following items:

    • Student housing in hostels
    • Excursions
    • On-site orientation activities including an introduction to Japan and Korea, etc.
    • Travel insurance to cover accident/sickness medical coverage, emergency medical evacuation, security extraction, and other travel assistance services
    • Other program-related costs including fees for group transportation, guest speakers, etc.
    • The initial non-refundable deposit of $400, which is due at the time of application and is applied to the program fee
    Please note that the list of items included in the program fee is not all-inclusive and is subject to change.

    The following items are excluded from the program fee:

    • International airfare
    • Personal expenses (souvenirs, routine medical expenses, toiletries, etc.)
    • Course materials (textbooks and readers)
    • Other travel expenses (passport, visa, etc.)
    • Additional meals
    • Commuting costs for daily travel to and from classes
  • Timeline
    Application opens February 1, 2017
    Application closes March 10, 2017
    Applicants notified of selection March 22, 2017
    Deadline to confirm participation or cancel for a refund of all program-related fees, minus $400 deposit April 3, 2017
    Attend pre-departure orientation* Late April-May
    Arrive in Japan May 28, 2017
    Last day of program July 5, 2017
    * These events take place on the Berkeley campus. If you are not on campus during this time, we will schedule a meeting via phone or Skype.
    All dates are subject to change.
  • Instructors

    Tetsushi Ogata, Ph.D.
    Program Director
    Email: togata@berkeley.edu 


    Tetsushi Ogata is Lecturer in Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He was Director of the Genocide Prevention Program at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University. He has, among others, organized a series of genocide prevention workshops that trained officials from UN member states between 2007-10; facilitated the launch of national committees for genocide prevention in member states of the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region in Africa; collaborated with the European governments to advance their polices on genocide prevention through organizing the Genocide Prevention Advisory Network; and supported the leading governments in the communities of genocide prevention and the Responsibility to Protect to launch the Global Action Against Mass Atrocity Crimes, a global network of atrocity prevention focal points around the world. He has also served as Secretary-Treasurer of the Executive Board of the International Association of Genocide Scholars. His aritcles include "Emerging Paradigms of Genocide Prevention" in Politorbis (2010) and "Supporting Regional Approaches to Genocide Prevention: the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR)" in Genocide Prevention Advisory Network (2011), "Preventing Genocide: Towards Systematic Engagement by States" in Civilians and Ideology of War (2012). He has taught genocide prevention courses at the undergraduate and graduate programs of S-CAR. He completed his BA in Liberal Arts with concentration in International Studies from Soka University of America and his MS and PhD in Conflict Analysis and Resolution.